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Top 11 Health Benefits of Singing

It doesn’t matter if you are good or bad. Face it, everyone does it! Whether it’s in the shower, in your bedroom, in the car, or at work, everyone likes to sing. It is a form of expression and communication that speaks to people and makes us feel great. And, singing has health benefits, too!

Communication Skills

Singing is a form of communication first introduced to us as infants. According to Sally Goddard Blythe, author of The Genius of Natural Childhood and director of the Institute for Neuro-Physiological Psychology, singing is the most effective way to develop communication skills in a child because it prepares the brain and voice for language. In a neuro-imaging scan of a child’s brain while listening to music, activity was shown not just in the hotspots, but in large areas in both hemispheres of the brain.

Better Brain Cognition

A neurobiologist from Northwestern University presented her musical findings at the American Psychological Association’s 122nd Annual Convention. She tested hundreds of children in public schools in impoverished areas and found that the kids who sang or were learning a musical instrument had improved neural function and attention span. Their IQs also improved after each year of music and singing lessons.

A Natural Mood Booster

The same as exercise, singing can release endorphins, the chemicals in your brain that make you feel good and happy. Scientists discovered that the sacculus, a small organ in the ear, reacts to the frequencies in singing, creating a sense of pleasure when heard.

Alertness

In 2015, The Alzheimer’s Society created the “Singing for the Brain” program to help with their patients’ memories. What they discovered was that the oxygen exchange that occurs when breathing in and out during singing actually increases blood circulation, creating a better-oxygenated bloodstream through the body as well the brain. However, this is not exclusive to people with dementia. It can apply to anyone who wants to improves memory and concentration.

Strengthens Immune System

The University of Frankfurt performed a study on a choir in which they took blood and saliva samples from each of the members before and after a one-hour rehearsal. What they found was that the choir members had increased levels of S-IgA (Secretory immunoglobulin A), proteins that act like antibodies in the immune system. The effects of singing choral music were significantly opposite from just listening to it, which gave decreased S-IgA levels.

Decreases Stress Levels

When singing, a person breathes in and out between phrases, emulating slow breathing for relaxation. Muscle tension is released, which lowers cortisol, a stress hormone, in our bloodstream. Oxytocin is also produced, which can alleviate stress as a natural stress reliever.

Lower Blood Pressure

If you have a high blood pressure and are taking medication for it, singing might be the best natural medication for you. Singing has been proven to influence the body to relax and reduce blood pressure, lowering your anxiety.

Improves Your Posture

Maintaining good posture is a habit that can be easily created by singing because posture is a significant part of the correct technique. The chest cavity expands, causing the back and shoulders to align properly. According to Harvard Health, having good posture prevents you from having inflexible muscles muscle that can limit your range of motion, and it also promotes better breathing.

A Good Exercise

Singing is a great workout for those who are injured, disabled, or elderly. Applying the correct technique and vocal exercises for singing can be a great exercise for the lungs and also develop a stronger diaphragm by contracting the abdominal muscles. The oxygen used in singing is actually a greater amount than some other exercises. Therefore, it can promote better stamina and capacity.

Get Better Sleep

Everyone knows someone who snores or maybe has sleep apnea. Whatever the case, Alise Ojay, a drama therapist from the University of York, wanted to conduct an experiment called “Singing for Snorers” to help her friend. She collaborated with the University of Exeter, UK, and found that singing helps strengthen throat muscles, which decreases the frequency of snoring. With time, it can significantly reduce sleep apnea.

Live Longer

Can singing help you live longer? It definitely can! The University of San Francisco conducted a study to prove this idea. Researchers used people from senior centers in the Bay Area and formed 12 choirs. They tested their balance, lower body strength, and the respiratory system before and after the study. What they found was that the people in the choir fell less and had stronger legs. Julene Johnson from the UCSF Institute for Health and Aging also found that 30% of the older adults who complained of shortness of breath had improved breathing. In a later study in Scandinavia, singing was determined to be the key to a longer life, along with camping and dancing.

 

Health Benefits of Relaxing in Nature

It’s natural human instinct to pine for the outdoors, and it’s due to a primal instinct that is still ingrained in our psyche to yearn for the relief of the open.  But it comes down to more than just instinct, there are physical benefits to leaving the city lights and breathing fresh, clean air.

 

Research is increasingly illuminating the rich and measurable benefits of being in nature.  And the beauty of it is that nature has no set formula: some of us like to fish, hunt, hike, kayak, jog or simply take pictures of the perfect sunset.

 

  • Feel Better Emotionally: We all know how we feel when we do our favorite outdoor activity, exhilarated, calm, relaxed, fortified, and restored.
  • Feel Better Physically: Time spent in nature is associated with a decrease in blood pressure, sympathetic nerve activity, and heart rate.
  • Have a Better Workout:  Several studies have shown that having a “green” workout leaves subjects feeling increased energy, greater revitalization, less depression, and less anger when they exercised outdoors versus exercising indoors.
  • Feel Better Mentally:  Being outdoors replenishes voluntary attention, help those with ADHD, enhances brain connectivity for more efficient focus.

 

All the research also points to the fact that time in nature most powerfully nurtures us when we’re most “at risk” – of disease, depression, or desperation.

 

So whether you take an outdoor vacation, simply take an afternoon trip, or step outside your office for a lunch break in a public park, it’s important to expose yourself to the health benefits of nature on a regular basis.  Health Fitness Revolution recommends being outdoors at least twice a week for an hour to start noticing the benefits long-term.

 

The Health Benefits of Massage

Massages aren’t just relaxing, they are associated with many health benefits when performed by a licensed professional.  There have been many scientific studies that prove, through blood tests, that regular massages reduce inflammation, help with autoimmune conditions,  decrease stress hormones, and boost the immune system.  Here are the Health Benefits of Massage:

 

  • Ease Pain: 80% of Americans will suffer from back pain, and studies show that a massage can greatly reduce back pain, stiffness, and improve range of motion- especially in those with osteoarthritis.
  • Curb Depression and Anxiety: Massages reduce the stress level cortisol, which result in reduced blood pressure and improved mood.  Massages also boost the hormones of dopamine and serotonin, which are involved in depression.
  • Improve Sleep:  Most people have fallen asleep during a massage- and there’s a reason for it!  Massages affect delta waves, which are the waves linked to deep sleep.
  • Boost Immune System: Research has shown that massages lead to increased white blood cell count, which combat disease and boost your immune system.
  • Raise Alertness: In a particular study, those who enjoyed a 15-min massage were more alert and completed math questions faster than a control group that had not had a massage.
  • Beauty Benefits:  Massages lead to increased blood-flow, which plumps skin, promotes healing, and helps the body rid itself of toxins through the lymphatic system.
  • Reduce Headaches:  Many headaches are due to tension, and getting regular massages will loosen neck muscles and stress levels, which can help those who regularly suffer from migraines and headaches.
  • Cancer Treatment Supplement: Because massages are known to relieve pain, anxiety, stress, depression, and nausea, massages can ease those that are going through rigorous treatment of illnesses.

 

Health Fitness Revolution recommends getting 1 to 2 massages a month in order to experience the full range of health benefits.

 

Health Benefits Of Including Your Dog In Fitness Workouts

Studies have continually shown that working out with a partner increases your motivation and the likelihood that you will actually stick to your training program. But finding a reliable, training partner who’ll motivate you consistently and never cancel is a challenge.  We know of a partner who will never come to you with “I’m tired”, “I’m busy”, “I’m not feeling well”… and that’s your very best friend – the family dog!

 

Here are the “Health Benefits Of Including Your Dog In Fitness Workouts” from HFR team and author of the book ReSYNC Your Life Samir Becic

 

  • You’re healthier for owning a dog:  Studies are now proving that dog owners are more likely to exercise regularly and to be fitter and healthier than their pooch-free peers. New research from Michigan State University reports that people with canine companions are 34% more likely to get the recommended 150 minutes of exercise a week than are folks with either other pets or none at all.
  • Dogs can do more for you than a treadmill: A big part of motivation is that when you interact with your dog, endorphins rise and stress levels fall. This emotional connection definitely gives an extra boost to your workout.
  • You’re more active because of your dog: Research shows that dog owners often log in twice as many workouts—they don’t see taking the dog out as a sweat session, so they still spin and lift.  A University of Missouri study found that overweight participants who walked dogs for 20 minutes five days a week for a year lost an average of 14 pounds.  If you include some light jogging, frisbee throwing, and tug of war, you can rev your metabolism up even more!
  • Your pooch will push you: You will never find anyone more excited to workout than your dog- so much so that studies reported that people who walked with their dogs increased their speed by 28 percent over 12 weeks, while those who strolled with a human friend got only 4 percent faster.  Your dog will never complain or be discouraged!
  • Dogs will keep you on a routine: Dogs are creatures of habit- which means that even if you try and forget to go on a regular morning run, you’re dog won’t, he will let you know in his way that it’s time to get off the couch.
  • Try new activities: Dogs love adventure, many will love to hike, bike, swim, or even watch you while you do bootcamp!
  • Borrow a dog: Even if you can’t own a dog because of where you live, or don’t want the responsibility, you can still get the health and emotional benefits by volunteering at a shelter and walking/playing with the dogs and fostering them on the weekends.
  • Listen to your dog: Some breeds are more active than others so it’s important to watch for sign of exhaustion in your dog and listen to his needs.  Try not to run on very hot black pavement and make sure he stays hydrated and happy!

 

Stretch Your Way to Better Health

Stretching is widely viewed as a part of fitness and fitness routines- pilates and yoga both combine stretching with strength training in a utilitarian way.  And while people will debate whether or not stretching prevents injury,  there is no doubt that stretching is good for health in many different ways:

 

  • Eases Stress:  Stress causes your muscles to contract, becoming tense. This muscle tension has negative effects on almost every part of your body. When this happens, it is important to stretch to relax the muscle and cause the release of endorphins, which not only boost your mood but also aid in stress elimination.
  • Increased Range of Motion:  Stretching regularly increases flexibility and range of motion in your joints, which promotes increased balance and motion throughout an entire lifetime.
  • Flexibility:  The 4 main measures of overall fitness are: aerobic, muscular, body composition and flexibility.  The way to increase flexibility is stretching- which becomes increasingly important as you age because your muscles become shorter and tighter.  Short and tight muscles cause restriction that make you more susceptible to tendon, muscle, and joint injuries.
  • Increase Blood Circulation:  Stretching increases blood flow to muscles, which bring an oxygenated supply of nutrients to muscles and cartilage.  This means, stretching reduces muscle soreness and accelerates muscle repair.
  • Eases Lower Back Pain: There are so many muscles that play a role in posture (quadriceps, hamstrings, lower back muscles and hip flexors), that stretching these muscles can greatly reduce or even eliminate the lower back pain that so many of us suffer from.

Tips for Stretching:

  • Ease in and hold for 10-15 seconds/ 30 seconds if you’re over 50
  • Breathe out as you go further into the stretch
  • Listen to your body, you should not be feeling sharp pain
  • Don’t bounce in your stretch, hold it- bouncing can lead to little muscle tears
  • Repeat- it is beneficial to do the same stretch 2 to 3 times
  • Don’t compare yourself to others and work at your own pace.  You will get more flexible with consistency and time.

 

Is An Economic Crisis Good For Your Health?

One of the most common reactions to earnest recommendations that we overhaul our eating habits, from a diet based largely on red meat and highly processed foods to one more focused on vegetables, fruit and whole foods, is that we can never really be sure what’s good for us. “Just wait,” someone inevitably jokes. “Tomorrow they’ll tell us that broccoli will kill us.”

 

Well, science has yet to suggest that. But it has delivered proof of the positive effect a societal change in diet can have on citizens’ health.

 

The subjects of the study were the people of Cuba, who unknowingly took part in a large-scale study on the effect of lifestyle change during their country’s extended economic downturn in the 1990s.

 

The economy began to collapse after the government of its state sponsor, the Soviet Union, fell in 1989. The Russian republic that emerged from the former regime soon ended its subsidies of cheap oil for Cuba. As Richard Schiffman reports in a fascinating new article in The Atlantic, the shift sent Cuba “into an economic tailspin from which it would not recover for over half a decade.”

 

The effects were widespread. Most motorized agriculture and food distribution systems halted. The ongoing U.S. trade embargo, strengthened by Congress in 1996, further prevented the import of many drugs, manufactured goods and food products. “Cubans survived drinking sugared water and eating anything they could get their hands on,” Schiffman writes, “including domestic pets and the animals in the Havana Zoo.”

 

And yet the population’s health actually improved, in some ways dramatically, according to a study recently released by researchers working in Cuba, Spain and the United States and published by the medical journal BMJ.

 

Researchers tracking the health of about 6,000 residents and analyzing national data compiled by the Cuban Ministry of Public Health found that mortality in the island country dropped during the depression. Death from cardiovascular disease fell by a third, and from adult-onset Type 2 diabetes by half. The rate of strokes was reduced, too.

 

Despite its economic struggles, Cuba maintained an effective health-care system. But the study found that it was not the doctors that kept citizens healthy but the lifestyle changes poverty forced on them.

 

With public transportation largely idled by the gas crisis, more people walked and bicycled. Adults also ate less, losing an average 12 pounds as their daily calorie intake dropped from about 3,000 to between 1,400 and 2,400, according to the new research. Diets were transformed as well. Protein intake dropped an average of 40% as meat and dairy products became luxuries and families turned to de facto veganism, Schiffman reports, living off “what they could grow, catch and pick for themselves — including lots of high-fiber fresh produce and fruits, added to the increasingly hard-to-come-by staples of beans, corn and rice.”

 

Cuba had gone green, even if unintentionally. With limited access to agro-chemicals, “farmers returned to the machetes and oxen-drawn plows of their ancestors,” Schiffman notes. Community gardens flourished in major cities.

 

Cuba’s state-controlled economy regained some of its footing in the late 1990s, due in large part to the support of oil-rich Venezuela. And as soon as cheap access to oil was restored, Cubans began exercising less and eating more. By 2011, the researchers found, the nation’s obesity rate had almost tripled from its 1995 low. Diabetes and cardiovascular disease rates rose in lockstep with obesity and the national mortality rate returned to pre-downturn levels.

 

In an editorial accompanying the study in BMJ, Professor Walter Willett of the Harvard School of Public Health wrote: “Although the hardships experienced by Cubans in the 1990s were unfortunate, the present findings add powerful evidence that major population-wide benefits will be obtained rapidly by reducing overweight and obesity. To achieve this is perhaps the major public health and societal challenge of this century.”

 

Schiffman joins Willett in wondering what the United States can learn from the Cuban experience as our own health care system struggles to manage soaring rates of Type 2 diabetes. The American Diabetes Association’s chief medical officer, Dr. Robert Rattner, says 1 in 3 American adults could have the condition by 2050. Meanwhile, heart disease, which like diabetes is closely linked to a sedentary lifestyle and unhealthy diet, remains the leading cause of death in the United States.

 

The authors of the Cuban study suggest that other countries seek to recreate the Caribbean nation’s experience — without the economic downturn — through public health campaigns, redesigned public spaces, limits on unhealthy food and drink, especially for children, and taxes on sugary and fatty foods. They acknowledge, though, a troubling reality: “No country or regional population has successfully reduced the distribution of body mass index or reduced the prevalence of obesity through public health campaigns or targeted treatment programs.”

 

In the absence of national initiative, it’s up to each of us to do what we can to improve our own health. What can you do? Here are some fundamental steps that could boost your health and prolong your life. If enough of us adopt them, we may see a reduction in our national rates of diabetes and heart disease, and we’ll ward off more cases of dementia, too:

 

  • Eat healthier. The Mediterranean diet has been shown to help prevent 30 percent of heart attacks and strokes for people at high risk of those conditions. It features olive oil, fish, fruits, vegetables and unrefined grains. Wine, eggs and low-fat dairy products are allowed in moderation. One key to the diet’s success is that it eschews highly processed snacks and prepared foods that are low on nutrients and high on additives. 
  • Try vegetarianism. We saw the impact a meat shortage had on Cubans’ health. Forgoing meat in this country is easier than ever as alternatives continue to improve and become more affordable. Becoming a vegan or vegetarian is no protection against obesity or metabolic syndrome if you continue to feast on processed foods low on fiber and loaded with fat and sugar. Focus on whole foods.
  • Get movingA sedentary lifestyle is one of the greatest health risks. Sitting for more than three hours a day can cut one’s life expectancy by two years and the effects are not entirely offset by regular exercise. C. Everett Koop, a former surgeon general, recommended a minimum of 10,000 steps a day — about five miles. The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advises all adults to get 150 minutes of moderate aerobic exercise a week. Barely half of us do either.

 

The Cubans, in a way, had good health forced on them. The discouraging news is that when it was no longer economically necessary to live a healthier, more active lifestyle, the population basically dropped it. Clearly the challenge for our country — to make such changes voluntarily and stick with them — is even more daunting.

 

As published originally in Forbes

10 MORE Great and Easy Health Tips

  • Eat more fruit and vegetables that have high water content such as tomatoes,watermelons, kiwi and grapes.These foods contain about 90 to 95% water, so you can eat a lot of these and they will fill you up without adding on the pounds.
  • Cut out the fried food and switch to baked. Fried foods are immersed in fat and oil which gets absorbed into the food itself and is retained even after it has been drained.
  • Try to set a meal pattern to help you to control what you eat and when you eat it. It is also better to have 5 small meals a day rather than just one or two huge meals. Having a small snack in the morning and afternoon stops you getting over hungry and then wolfing down an extra large portion at dinner time.
  • Is your energy lagging? Though it may be the last thing you feel like doing when you’re tired, exercise — even a brisk walk — can be more effective than a nap or cup of coffee at fighting fatigue.
  • To remove excess fat from soups, stews or sauces, drop in 3 or 4 ice cubes. The fat will congeal around them as they melt. You can then remove the fat and reheat if necessary to re-thicken.
  • Everyone knows that breakfast is the most important meal of the day, but still go without it. Breakfast is what gets the metabolism going and keep it going throughout the day. After sleeping all night, your body is no longer full so the best thing for it is food. Retain your focus and energy with a healthy and nutritious meal.
  • What door? What stairs? Any door, any stairs. When you get to the grocery store, the hardware store, or wherever you are going, let everybody else compete for the front parking spaces, while you park farther away. If you have to go up a couple of stories in a building, take the stairs, instead of an escalator or elevator. Every step in a day makes a positive contribution to your health. Unless you are disabled, there is no good reason to park close or use a people-mover. Get used to the back of the lot and the stairwell, and you’ll find yourself a lot closer to the front of the pack in terms of fitness.
  • Vigorous work-outs – when you’re breathing hard and sweating – help your heart pump better, give you more energy and help you look and feel best. Start with a warm-up that stretches your muscles. Include 20 minutes of aerobic activity, such as running, jogging, or dancing. Follow-up with activities that help make you stronger such as push-ups or lifting weights. Then cool-down with more stretching and deep breathing.
  • Preparing for sleep at night begins during the daytime. Engage in some sort of aerobic exercise such as brisk walking in the afternoon or early evening. Daily exercise is one of the best ways to improve the quality of sleep because it helps you fall asleep faster and longer. People who exercise spend a greater amount of time in stage three and four sleep, the most restorative and repairing stages of sleep.
  • Crummy weather? Take a mall walk. Check your mall to see if they offer a mall-walking program or early morning hours for walkers. If it doesn’t, you can still get there first thing in the morning — hours before the teens get out of bed — do a few laps, and then treat yourself to a skim milk latte. Invite a friend along, and agree to do one quick lap for some harder exercise, and then one moderate lap for a little bit of window shopping — then repeat, one fast lap/one relaxed, on the upper level.

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What Your Blood Type Says About Your Health

Not only is knowing your blood type important in the case of an emergency, but recent research is showing that it can say a lot about the diseases you’re susceptible to and the way your body reacts to stress.  Here are a few things your blood type says about you:

 

  • Different Blood Types React to Stress Differently:  It is well known that type A people have more of the stress hormone cortisol in their bodies and produce more during stressful times.  However, research is now showing that people with Type O blood type have a “fight or flight” reaction to stress which results in the overproduction of adrenaline. This means that it is more difficult for Type O’s to clear the adrenaline from their systems, taking them longer to recover from stressful situations.
  • Your Blood Type Antigens are Everywhere in Your Body:  This includes your entire digestive tract, as well as your lungs and nasal passages. Because these blood type antigens are everywhere, they influence how your body reacts to the food you eat through several factors. For example: the lecins in certain foods bind to your blood type antigen and cause your blood to agglutinate (stick together), resulting in feelings of fatigue, headaches, digestive issues, skin problems and a host of other health issues.
  • The Type of Bacteria in your Gut is Related to Your Blood Type: certain bacteria are 50,000 more likely to turn up in people with one blood type over another.  This originated from our ancestors whose digestive tracts developed to accommodate one type of diet over another. Research done recently has shown that the microbial genomes of certain people developed to break down carbohydrates much more efficiently (blood type A). People lacking this ability (blood type O) tend to store carbs as fat.
  • Blood Type May Predict Disease Susceptibility:  Research has found that those with certain blood types may be at a higher risk for certain diseases!
    • Studieshave found:
      • People with blood type O: have a lower risk for heart disease, but a higher risk for developing stomach ulcers.
      • People who are blood type A: have higher risks of microbial infections, but Type A women experience a higher rate of fertility.
      • People with blood type AB and B have a much higher risk of developing pancreatic cancer.

 

How Cinnamon Benefits Health

Who doesn’t love a sprinkling of cinnamon on a warm apple or atop a chai latte?  It’s just one of those spices that tastes fantastic.  But taste is not the only reason to love cinnamon.  Here are 10 cinnamon health benefits:

  • It  regulates blood sugar it’s a great choice for diabetics
    and hypoglycemics alike.  It is also great for anyone who wants stable energy levels and moods.
  • It reduces LDL cholesterol levels.  LDL is also known as the harmful cholesterol.  Reducing it may help reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease.
  • It has natural anti-infectious compounds.  In studies, cinnamon has been effective against ulcer-causing H. pylori bacteria and other pathogens.
  • It reduces pain linked to arthritis.  In studies, cinnamon has been shown to reduce cytokines linked to arthritic pain.
  • Research done at the University of Texas shows that cinnamon may reduce the proliferation of cancer cells, holding promise for cancer prevention and sufferers of the disease.
  • Cinnamon is a natural food preservative.
  • Cinnamon contains fiber, calcium, iron, and manganese.
  • Cinnamon been proven effective for menstrual pain.
  • Cinnamon has been shown to aid with infertility.  Cinnamon contains a natural chemical called cinnamaldehyde, which studies show increases the hormone progesterone and decreases testosterone production in women, helping to balance hormones.
  • Cinnamon is an antiviral antifungal, and antibacterial machine, so it does more than just boost the immune system — it actually fights the pathogens that cause illness.

 

Smile- It’s Good for Your Health!

Smiling is the fun way to live longer! Smiling is a great way to make yourself stand out while helping your body to function better. Smile to improve your health, your stress level, and your attractiveness…

 

  • Smiling is a Stress Buster! Stress can really show up in our faces. Smiling helps to prevent us from looking tired, worn down, and overwhelmed. When you are stressed, take time to put on a smile. This will reduce your stress levels and you’ll be better able to take action.
  • Smiling Lowers Blood Pressure.  Happy people are healthier- because when you smile, there is a measurable reduction in your blood pressure. Give it a try if you have a blood pressure monitor at home and we can guarantee you’ll see a difference.
  • Smiling is an Immune Booster. Smiling helps the immune system to work better. When you smile, immune function improves possibly because you are more relaxed. What a fun way to prevent the flu and colds!
  • Smiling indirectly helps Weight Lossbecause when you are relaxed and happy your body produces less cortisol- the stress hormone that make us hold on to belly fat.
  • Smiling Is Attractive.  We are all drawn to people who smile. The subconscious attraction is that we want to know a smiling person and figure out what is so good.
  • Smiling is a Mood Changer.   Nexttime you are feeling sad, try putting on a smile. Your mood will change for the better. Smiling can trick the body into helping you change your mood.  As they say… Fake it until you make it!
  • Smiling Is Contagious- so the Happiness can Spread. When someone is smiling they lighten up the room, change the moods of others, and make things happier. A smiling person brings happiness with them. Smile lots and you will draw people to you and make them more at ease.
  • Smiling Releases Endorphins and Serotonin. Studies have shown that smiling releases endorphins, natural pain killers, and serotonin. Together these three hormones make us feel good. Smiling is a natural drug and an anti-depressant.
  • Smiling Makes You Look Youthful.  The muscles we use to smile lift the face, making a person appear younger. Don’t go for a face lift, just try smiling your way through the day — you’ll look younger and feel better.
  • Smiling Leads to Success.  Smiling people appear more confident, are more likely to be promoted, and more likely to be approached. Put on a smile at appointments and meeting and take notice to how people react differently to you.
  • Smiling Keeps You Positive and Happy.  Here is a test: Smile. Now try to think of something negative without losing the smile. It’s hard. When we smile our body is sending the rest of us a message that “Life is Good!” Stay away from depression, stress and worry by smiling.